Two Kinds of Truth

Two Kinds of Truth

Large Print - 2017
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Harry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando police and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's three-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the dangerous big-business world of prescription drug abuse. Meanwhile, an old case from Bosch's LAPD days comes back to haunt him when a long-imprisoned killer claims Harry framed him and seems to have new evidence to prove it. Bosch left the LAPD on bad terms, so his former colleagues aren't keen to protect his reputation. He must fend for himself in clearing his name and keeping a clever killer in prison. The two unrelated cases wind across each other like strands of barbed wire. Along the way Bosch discovers that there are two kinds of truth: the kind that sets you free and the kind that leaves you buried in darkness.
Publisher: New York :, Little, Brown and Company,, 2017
Edition: First large print edition
ISBN: 9780316476676
0316476676
Characteristics: 513 pages ; 25 cm
Alternative Title: 2 kinds of truth

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b
brangwinn
Jun 12, 2018

What more can I say than I love Harry Bosch. He’s real, he’s gritty, honorable and in his own gruff way a loveable [p;oce detective.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

The description pretty much gives away the first quarter of the book but it is likely the hook that draws in new readers. For me, just the name of its author got me by hook, line and sinker. This time, Connelly told of a Bosch working his butt off, hence relatively free of police procedural nuances, to right every wrong he deemed. The price: sleep, empathy, danger and even his "earth quake" money! The bonus is the Russian pharmacists schemes that I never would have imagined. Another very good page turner. Too bad Det. Renée Ballard from his "The Late Show (2017)" couldn't be written in somehow.

Note: The two kinds of truth is better said in the book i.e. more straight forward and less psychological than in the description. See "Quotes."

t
talk2terih
Apr 12, 2018

It is consistently a pleasure to dig into a new Connelly Bosch book and this is no exception. Although I wouldn't call it the best of the series that is not really a criticism. The stories are all so good that one has to nitpick to differentiate them.

As always, Connelly has Bosch adroitly balancing several cases at a time. He is particularly stressed this time as he himself is the defendant in one of them. But tired, stressed, overworked, and with 1,000 things on his mind is always when Bosch is at his best.

Readers will be delighted to find roles in this book for many of the key characters in Bosch's past, including the slick, crafty, risk-taking Lincoln lawyer, Micky Haller, and several of Bosch's former partners.

Definitely recommended reading.

r
richmole
Mar 16, 2018

Discovered Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch series in 2000, and happily, was in a time & place where I could easily catch up--read the first six novels in sequence. Knew I had stumbled onto something special.

Nine years later, read what I consider the very best book in this series, Nine Dragons, which chronicles Harry's desperate search in Hong Kong for his abducted daughter. Unparalleled.

Two Kinds of Truth comes close to that 2009 entry. Here are some reasons why:
1. Harry's works through two cases simultaneously, and one of them impacts him personally.
2. The book brings Harry into contact in a very meaningful way with his half-brother, defence attorney Mickey Haller ("The Lincoln Lawyer"). It's been years since the last instalment in that series, so this was a very welcome surprise. This means the book also includes a major courtroom drama.
3. This book brings together a host of long-time supporting players, two former LAPD partners, a meaningful contribution from Cisco, Mick's investigator and his old friend, retired counsellor "Legal Stiegel."
4. One of the cases involves a little-know but fascinating timely topic: a made-in-the-USA illicit drug operation.
Wow. They'd don't come much better than this.

Highly recommended.

Note: beware! Following comments include many spoilers. You might want to stop reading now and just click "Place a hold."

w
wmtlady
Feb 27, 2018

I don't know how Michael Connelly does it but I think this is the BEST yet in the "Harry Bosch" series. Both fast-paced and descriptive; nothing extraneous, and readers new to the series should not feel ignorant regarding character connections and yet Connelly doesn't waste time and space on lengthy past explanations. Connelly has yet again come up with timely, current and potent plot issues and delivered his story at the top of his game.

m
midori_hon
Jan 29, 2018

a reliable addition to the long-running series
'Harry Bosch discovers that there are two kinds of truth: the kind that sets you free and the kind that leaves you buried in darkness.'
harry must work with mickey haller (the lincoln lawyer) to keep a serial killer behind bars and save his reputation.

m
mimimcl
Jan 27, 2018

Vintage Harry Bosch. Great read. Go back and read his earlier books if you have not done so. Start with his service in Vietnam to really understand the character.

g
gogo12127
Jan 22, 2018

Harry Bosch is back as a volunteer working cold cases for the San Fernando police and is called out to a local drug store where a young pharmacist has been murdered. Bosch and the town's three-person detective squad sift through the clues, which lead into the dangerous big-business world of prescription drug abuse. Meanwhile, an old case from Bosch's LAPD days comes back to haunt him when a long-imprisoned killer claims Harry framed him and seems to have new evidence to prove it. Bosch left the LAPD on bad terms, so his former colleagues aren't keen to protect his reputation. He must fend for himself in clearing his name and keeping a clever killer in prison. The two unrelated cases wind across each other like strands of barbed wire. Along the way Bosch discovers that there are two kinds of truth: the kind that sets you free and the kind that leaves you buried in darkness. (Description taken from library catalog.)

This is another great crime novel by the best crime novelist today. It ends with a hint of what the next Harry Bosch will be about.

PimaLib_ChristineR Jan 19, 2018

The hits keep on coming. This is another strong entry in the Bosch series. Connelly explores two issues here.

First, Harry is working a double homicide with the San Fernando PD, which is linked to a crime syndicate. My only beef here is that throughout the book, what is obviously OxyContin is referred to as Oxycodone. It's a misstep that breaks the verisimilitude for me. OC is called Hillbilly Heroin, oxycodone in other formulations is not, and would never be given in the doses described in the novel. Regardless, Connelly does an expert job of taking us into the octopus-like stranglehold that the opiod addiction has on the country and gives us realistic details of how these drugs are put on the streets.

At the same time, someone that Bosch put on death row is asking to have his conviction vacated. At first, this felt like a side story, maybe some filler, but as this storyline progressed, Connelly did an awesome job at tying this to our current economy and the shady deals done in the aftermath of the 2009 recession. How they come together? Well let's just say, I think it's Bosch's fault, but he thinks it is the fault of his attorney, and half-brother, Mickey Haller.

Loved all the flashback characters. I hope Connelly keeps churning these out in real-time. His writing has never been better.

k
KLRoss_0
Jan 13, 2018

Two Kinds of Truth is as good as any of the Bosch novels, and I've read them all. I hope Connelly continues to bring back old characters such as Jerry Edgar, Lucia Soto and Cisco in subsequent books. The reappearance of Mickey Haller was especially welcome. I am hoping that Connelly will consider re-directing his time and creative energy by resurrecting Haller in new stand alone novels, and let Renee Ballard sail off into the sunset. On her paddleboard.

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Quotes

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j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

***Please don't read quotes to avoid spoilers***
Bosch’s relationship with the LAPD since his forced retirement three years earlier had been strained at best and his attorney had urged him to protect himself by documenting all interactions with the department.
===
Officially it was a missing-persons case but it had gathered three feet of stacked files over fifteen years because it was classified as such only because a body had never been found.
===
a unit that would respond to the seeming groundswell of cases where new forensic technologies had led to hundreds of exonerations of people imprisoned across the country. Not only was new science leading the way, but old science once thought to be unassailable as evidence was being debunked and swinging open prison doors for the innocent.
===
More inmates died of suicide than the needle on death row in California.
===
They did a protocol thirty years ago,” Bosch said. “But back then, they looked for ABO genetic markers instead of DNA.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

For at least the past couple of decades, the department had been using red evidence tape that cracked and peeled if tampered with. Back in 1988, white rectangular stickers with LAPD ANALYZED EVIDENCE printed on them along with a signature and date line were used to seal evidence boxes.
===
… he had also clearly marked on the box “187”—the California penal code for murder—which in the evidence room meant “Don’t throw away.”
===
“We have an obligation. ‘Better that one hundred guilty men go free than one innocent man be imprisoned.’”
“Spare me your bastardized Ben Franklin bullshit,” Bosch said. “We found evidence connecting Borders to all three of those women’s disappearances, and your office passed on two of them, some snot-nosed prosecutor saying there was not enough. This doesn’t fucking make sense. I want the nine days to do my own investigation and I want access to everything you have and everything you’ve done.”

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

“I’ve seen it before. On a case where we talked to a profiler. It’s an angry shot. It has payback written all over it.” “He knew the shooters?” “No doubt. Either he knew them or they knew him. Or both.”
===
There was not a single computer in the Robbery-Homicide Division in 1987. Reports were either handwritten or typed out on IBM Selectrics. Most of the time chronos were handwritten.
===
Unlike Danielle Skyler and thousands of other would-be artists who roll into L.A. each year with the certainty of the tide on Venice Beach, Borders didn’t have to work in hospitality or in phone sales or anywhere else. Borders was from a suburb of Boston and was staked by his parents in his efforts to become a movie star. His rent and car were paid for and his credit-card bills were sent to Boston.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

Danielle Skyler’s story was the universal story of Los Angeles, with an added irony of origin. Raised by a single mother who worked as a motel maid in Hollywood, Florida, she filled the holes in her life with applause that came with success in beauty pageants and on the high school stage. Armed with her beauty and fragile confidence, she crossed the three thousand miles from Hollywood to Hollywood at age twenty. She found, as most do, that there was one of her from every small town in America. The paying jobs were few and she was often taken advantage of by the leeches who were part of the entertainment industry.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

The truth revealed that he was an idealist who saw something wrong and was blindly trying to do the right thing. And it cost him his life.
===
It was similar to the psychology that often led a murderer to volunteer to join the search for the missing person they had actually killed and buried. They had to get close to the investigation to learn what was going on, while hiding in plain sight also brought them psychological fulfillment.
===
Courts across the country had long approved the use of deception and trickery by police in an interview setting with a suspect, holding that an innocent person would see through the deception and not falsely confess to the crime.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

“In this country, there are two million people in prison. Two million. If the system gets it wrong one percent of the time, that is twenty thousand innocent people in jail. Lower it to a half of a percentage point and you’re still at ten thousand people. This is what keeps me awake at night. Why I always say, the scariest client is the innocent man. Because there is so much at stake.”
===

Soon they were driving along the south perimeter of Whiteman Airport, a small general-aviation field ironically named, considering that it was surrounded by a community that was overwhelmingly brown and black.
===
...the forced relocation of an entire Latino neighborhood to make way for the baseball stadium near downtown. The bitterness of the move—including many tearful and violent evictions recorded on news cameras—still blemished the history of the much-loved team.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

You might think sitting up here all day is boring but you try spending a summer in a double-wide with a single-wide AC unit, you want hot and boring.
===
“What kind of clinic doesn’t have a sign out front?” “The illegitimate kind.” “And those are patients?” “Maybe pill shills. Jerry, the medical board investigator, called them that. They go to the so-called clinic, get a prescription, and then go collect the pills at the pharmacy. They’re paid a dollar a pill. I guess it’s not bad if you’re picking up sixty pills a pop.”
===
Oxycodone scrips usually come in thirty-milligram pills. But he said the holy grail of hillbilly heroin these days is the eighty-meg dose. Also something called oxymorphone. It’s the next big thing. The high is supposedly ten times as powerful as you get with oxycodone.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

“Jerry said old people make the best shills. They’re prized.” “Why’s that?” “Because they want people who look old enough to be on Medicare. They give them counterfeit Medicare D cards—they buy the names of legit cardholders—and then they don’t have to pay full price for the prescriptions they fill.” Bosch shook his head in disbelief. “So Medicare pays the pharmacy back for the drugs,” he said. “In other words, the federal government finances the operation.”
===

“If you think the days are wide open here, you should check this place out at night,” O’Connor said. “We close the tower at eight. It’s an uncontrolled field after that. People can come in and out as they please—and they do.” “You just leave the runway lights on?” Bosch asked. “No, the lights are radio controlled. Anybody in a plane can toggle them on and off. The only thing you have to worry about are the drag racers.”

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

It was said among cops that a true test of a partnership came when there was an officer-needs-help call. The response is to drop everything and go, pinning the accelerator to the floor and blowing through traffic lights with the siren blaring to get to the officer in need. True partners each take one side of every intersection as they speed through. The driver takes the left, the passenger takes the right, each calling out “Clear!” as the car screams through red lights and intersections.
===
Opiate addiction, in case you don’t know, clogs the pipes. It stunts the gastrointestinal tract. Bottom line is, you can’t shit. So one of the big pharmaceutical companies comes up with a prescription laxative that does the job and costs about twenty times what your over-the-counter laxative runs.
===
We are talking big money and with big money comes big danger. This kid had no idea what he was bringing on when he decided to stand tall.

j
jimg2000
May 15, 2018

“They call the people involved in the mills ‘cappers,’” he said. “They run the show and you need unscrupulous doctors and pharmacies in the mix to make it all work.” “The cappers are not the doctors or pharmacists?” Bosch asked. “No, they’re the bosses. It starts with them either opening a clinic or going into an existing clinic in a marginal neighborhood. They go to a dirtbag doctor, somebody just this side of having their license revoked. A lot of docs that worked in the medical marijuana joints are perfect candidates. The capper goes in and says, ‘Doc, how’d you like to make five grand a week for a couple mornings in my clinic?’ That’s good money for somebody like that and they sign up.”
===
Remember what they used to say about the banks and Wall Street being too big to fail? It’s like that. But too big to shut down.

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